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ARE YOU BEING CHEATED BY YOUR EMPLOYER?

Legal Assistance with Overtime and Wage Disputes

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Common Scenarios

DO ANY OF THESE DESCRIBE YOUR SITUATION?

  • You have been fired or laid off and you have not received your final paycheck.
  • You have been fired or laid off and not received your unused vacation.
  • You have been fired or laid off and not received your severance.
  • You are paid at your regular hourly rate for all hours you work, even if you work over 40 hours in a single workweek.
  • You are paid the same weekly salary no matter how many hours you work, and you aren’t involved in management, supervision or decision making for the business.
  • You don’t get paid overtime when you work more than 40 hours in one week and less than 40 hours in the next week.
  • You are not paid for overtime hours because you didn’t record the time you worked even though your employer knows or has reason to know that you are doing the work.
  • You are not paid for overtime hours because you didn’t get advance permission to work the overtime even though your employer knows or has reason to know that you are doing the work.
  • You work through your lunch break or eat lunch at your desk while continuing to work but don’t get paid for the time.
  • You get to work before your work day is scheduled to begin and start working doing such things as making work related telephone calls, or reading and responding to work e-mails, or setting up for the day but don’t get paid for this time.
  • You don’t clock in or sign in until your scheduled start time even though you get to work before your work day is scheduled to begin and start working.
  • You continue working after the end of the workday doing such things as cleaning up, making work related telephone calls, or reading and responding to work emails, or finishing paperwork, but don’t get paid for this time.
  • You clock out or sign out of work at the official end of the work day, but then you continue working but do not record this work time and do not get paid for it.
  • You take work home with you, but do not include the time spent working at home on your time record and don’t get paid for this time.
  • You write and answer work related e-mails at home or on the weekend but do not include this work time on your time record and don’t get paid for this time.
  • You spend significant time responding to BlackBerry messages and cell phone calls when you are away from the office but do not include this work time on your time record and don’t get paid for this time.
  • You work on-call at the office, but don’t get paid for this time.
  • You work on-call outside of the office but don’t get paid for the time you do on call work or you only get a small, flat amount of money which does not cover all the time you spend working on call.
  • Your employer calls you an "independent contractor" and pays you like one even though you work a regular workweek at your employer’s facility and are supervised by a company manager or official.
  • Your employer pays you for the same number of work hours each week and doesn’t keep track of your hours and, as a result, you are not paid for all the time you work.
  • You work more than 40 hours in a week and then are told to take an equal amount of time off in another work week.
  • Instead of paying you overtime, your employer gives you a bonus or something extra which does not equal being paid time and a half for each hour you worked over 40 hours in a single workweek.
  • You don’t get overtime because you are paid a “salary” and/or given the title of manager, assistant manager or supervisor, but do not have any real authority to “manage” or direct other employees or the business. You don’t have the authority to hire or fire others and your suggestions on such are not given any real weight.
  • You work for tips, but are required to share your tips with managers.
  • You are required to travel for your job from job site to job site or overnight, but are not paid for some or all of the time spent traveling.
  • Your employer requires you to wear a uniform, but makes you buy the uniform or pay for its cleaning and replacement.
  • You are required to attend work-related meetings and/or training sessions, but these hours are not included on your weekly time record and you are not paid for this time.
  • You are not paid for the time it takes to prepare for work such as putting on special clothing or filling out preliminary paper work.
  • Your employer deducts the cost of lost product from your paycheck.
  • Your employer deducts shortages from your paycheck.
  • Your employer deducts lost or broken tools from your paycheck.
  • You have to pay a fee in order to cash you paycheck.


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